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Journal

News/Business. Breaking news from around the world.

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PBS

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast

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Channel 71 (507 MHz)

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mpeg2video

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ac3

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528

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480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

China 11, Lufthansa 9, U.s. 6, Germany 4, Us 4, Angola 4, Ben Bernanke 3, Eu 3, Romney 3, Iran 3, Somalia 3, Afghanistan 3, Wyoming 2, Isaac 2, Obama 2, The Union 2, Berlin 2, United Nations 2, Hamburg 2, America 2,
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  PBS    Journal    News/Business. Breaking  
   news from around the world.  

    August 31, 2012
    6:30 - 7:00pm PDT  

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>> a warm welcome to you coming from the "journal" from berlin. >> this is what is coming up in the next half-hour -- lufthansa cabin crews go on strike, causing thousands to miss their flights. hundreds of others canceled. >> mitt romney pledges to restore the promise of america as he accepts the republican presidential nomination. >> a look at the presidential vote in angola, one of the fastest-growing economies on the planet.
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>> a strike by air lufthansa cabin crew has disrupted hundreds of flights in germany and other european locations. thousands of passengers have been stranded. >> right now, they are facing further delays from a rolling series of stoppages about pay and cost-cutting. frankfurt international says it has asked that no flights depart from the airport. >> intercontinental flights were not affected. union officials have promised more strikes in the coming days if the wage agreement is not reached soon. >> frankfurt airport ground to a standstill as the lufthansa cabin crew strike took effect. lufthansa had to cancel a around 200 out of 360 flights. >> i fly a lot. it is my wedding anniversary,
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and here i am waiting. it is annoying. >> you think the ground crew nom -- the ground crew, not the cabin crew, were striking. no one is here. >> it affects me, but they are entitled to strike. wage cutting in germany cannot continue like this. >> the dispute is not just about higher wages. the cabin crew also opposes the use of temporary staff on lufthansa flights. the company wants to employ temp workers on flights to and from berlin. the union accuses them of trying to erode pay and conditions. >> lufthansa wants to cut pay by 20% to 30% alongside this 3% wage increase over 36 months. we refuse to even discuss this. >> the strike ended at 1:00 on friday afternoon, but the knock on effects have lasted much longer. the union says it will take further action in the coming days. >> for more on the strike and its effects, we are happen to be joined now by christoph from our
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business desk. will this strike lasts for a while? >> we just heard union officials saying there will be more strike action soon until lufthansa comes to its senses, as one person put it, so passengers should continue to check the latest information. since this is a battle that is thought quite fiercely here, i would not be surprised if the intensity of measures are increasing quite quickly. >> what is at stake? what do both sides have to lose? >> lufthansa and employees are not fighting over percentages of wages, but it is rather a conflict of how the company wants to conduct its future business. lufthansa is saying their work force mix of 40% overall cost, and the cost needs to come down due to stiff competition -- workforce makes up 40% of overall cost. they're not highly skilled workers, so the company wants to rely on contractor workers
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instead, who are cheaper, and the flight attendants, of course, are fearful for their wages and jobs. >> contract workers are very controversial. what about the impact? what right do passengers have? >> there is a european regulation saying that passengers have the right to demand to be taken care of by the airline if they have to wait unexpectedly. for example, the airline is to provide food or phone calls after two hours waiting time if you are on a short distance light, four hours if you are on a long haul, if your flight is delayed by more than five hours, you can cancel and get your money back without any additional cost. however, if passengers should suffer any more loss or damage or further obstacles because of the strike, they are not entitled to any extra compensation. >> there is some redress their for passengers. thank you so very much. to the u.s. now where white house challenger mitt romney has been stumping in storm-ravaged
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new orleans to -- in a bid to burnish his presidential credentials ahead of the incumbent barack obama. >> the republican is seeking to build momentum by taking his campaign to the city where rescue crews are cleaning up after hurricane i sec released a torrential downpour. >> before hand, romney officially accepted the party nomination in florida. here is more about his focus on job creation. -- after hurricane is it -- isaac. >> it was the climax of a long journey and hard-fought primary campaign. >> i accept your nomination for president of the united states. am i in an emotional speech, romney highlighted his values as a family man, praising his wife and describe how she raised the couple's five sons. >> i had to travel a lot for my job then. i would call and try to offer support. but every mother knows that does not help get the homework done or get the kids out the door to school. i knew without question that her
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job as a mom was a lot more important than mine. [applause] >> ronnie's words targeted the political center rather than the parti's conservative core -- romney's words targeted the political center rather than the party's conservative court. >> does the america we want barrault a trillion dollars from china? >> no! >> does it fail to find the jobs that are needed for 23 million people and for half the kids graduating from college? >> no! >> romney supporters are% convinced that he can do better than the incumbent. one of them is oscar-winning actor john boyd. >> not only is he an expert in+ this area and in the area of leadership, but he is a wonderful guy, wonderful guide to be with. >> the hardest part begins now. the coming months of bruising home stretch to the campaign. >> trade relations between germany and china are flourishing. problems arose between angela
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merkel's two-day visit. one example is solar industry. the industry accuses chinese competitors of price dumping. >> that also filed a complaint with the european commission. chancellor raised the issue in beijing as she ended her visit. >> beijing's imperial splendor. the premier accompanied the chancellor to the forbidden city. it was once home to the chinese emperor and his court. today, it is a world heritage site. it picture of the two together capturing the closeness of chinese chess -- a picture of the two together capturing the closeness of chinese-german ties. the two leaders celebrated the 100 airbus 8-320 to be built here, due for delivery soon. >> for both germany and china, the aviation industry is strategically important -- a strategically important
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industrial sector, and it is a prospect with an enormous future. >> both countries want to keep and trade ties further, but representatives of german industry say that china has to open up its markets more. the outgoing chinese leadership gave the chancellor some encouraging signs as she heads home. >> a major announcement out of the u.s. -- federal reserve chairman ben bernanke says the u.s. government is ready to act to stimulate the economy if needed. >> in a speech to central bankers in wyoming, bernanke said he was gravely concerned about the stagnating labor market. the u.s. economy is so weak that it is hardly creating any jobs. the fed's next policy meeting is september 1 analysts expect a decision on a third round of quantitative easing. those statements from ben bernanke and the prospect of further quantitative easing in the u.s. put investors into a positive mood on the last day of the trading week. our markets correspondence has
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more. he sends us this report from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the doors for more quantitative easing in the united states remain open. this is what the market mix of the statements of ben bernanke, the fed chairman, in jackson hole, wyoming. his speech caused the stock market in frankfurt to end this last trading day of the week on the upside. the euro also was again up on statements by the french ecb director, fuelling speculation that next week would be -- bring a major plan by the european central bank, a plan which hopefully supports the government's in the eurozone to come to an end of the euro crisis -- the governments in the eurozone. >> the dax closed the day up over 1%, 6970. the euro stoxx 50 closing of
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1.5%. the dow jones is currently going up over 0.5%. the euro is trading at $1.2574. in the wake of the financial crisis, the eu has moved to tightening banking regulations. >> a number of european banks overextend themselves and were bailed out as they were on the verge of collapsing on the mountains of bad debt -- a number of european banks over extended themselves. >> many are now calling for a eurozone banking authority to be established. >> spain's bank is one of many struggling in the face of the european debt crisis. the eu commission wants to give the european central bank new powers to monitor banks. eurozone countries would be required to comply with the new bank regulations. but other eu countries could participate as well. in total, around 6000 banks and national monitoring groups would
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be involved. >> the tasks of the european central bank in cooperation with national supervisory authorities would be to oversee financial stability, to ensure that banks in the eurozone are financially sound and stable and viable and will not run into trouble and need taxpayer money for a bailout. >> but there are critics of the new system. the german finance minister has expressed his skepticism, and he has backers in the eu parliament. >> we need a strong european body inspecting multinational banks that prop up national finance systems, but we do not need massive bureaucracies that count every penny all the way down to every corner bank and credit union. >> the eu commission is pushing for the new regulations, despite criticism from germany. >> friday wraps up the last day of the non-alliance summit in iran. the country wanted the meeting
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to strengthen its influence in the region, but instead, it is coming under increasing diplomatic pressure. >> the united nations secretary- general called on iran to release its political prisoners. yesterday, the egyptian president spoke out against one of airtran's closest allies -- syria -- one ever ran -- one of iran's closest allies. >> instead of forging closer ties with egypt, iran found itself under siege for syria. >> that should take a stand on the issue in keeping with universally accepted principles. we should urge our -- all parties to recommit themselves to resolving the crisis peacefully. >> delegates could not agree on how to approach the serious
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crisis, but that was no big surprise. the lose body of non-aligned states was created as a platform for emerging economies that considered themselves sidelined in the existing world order -- the loose body of non-aligned states. >> they have no common goals apart from wanting to be heard. it gives small states equal footing and allows their voices to be heard. >> the movement was established in 1961 as a counterweight to nato, and the soviet-led warsaw pact. 25 countries were included back then. today, the number has swelled to 120. it is a very diverse collection from india and post-communist cuba to still secretive north korea. another 17 countries have observer status including brazil, china, and serbia. iran has sought out support in the crisis over its nuclear program, but the response has been mixed. united nations secretary-general ban ki-moon called on the
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country's leaders to improve cooperation with atomic energy watchdogs. the diverging positions have also frustrated and other iranian goal -- to establish the non-allied countries as an alternative to the united nations security council. this will not get the backing of most of the other non-aligned states. >> some of them would rather take a seat in the security council. that certainly applies for the larger countries like india. possibly also indonesia and others. many of the non-allied countries have no interest in any form of confrontation with the great powers. >> signs are that within the non-aligned states, iran will remain what it has been -- an important regional power whose political goals are not shared by most other members. >> more and more children are being caught up in violent conflict, both within states and between states. we will have that story when we come back. >> that's right. we will also be looking at the
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difficulty of reporting in china, and we've got some sports news for you, so stick around. >> don't go away.
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>> thanks so much for staying with us. >> welcome back. the angolan president is expected to extend his grip on power after elections held on friday. angola was wracked, of course, by decades of civil war after a declared independence from portugal in 1975. >> the opposition has been critical of the like toro process, pointing to issues with the voter roll. with 33 years in power, he is one of africa's longest-serving leaders. -- the opposition has been critical of the electoral process. >> new projects dot the skyline in angola's capital.
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ahead of the elections, the president cut the ribbon on one of these projects -- a promenade overlooking the atlantic. he cites the $360 million walkway as evidence of a hard- won peace and stability in the country. 10 years ago, things looked different. angola was wracked by civil war. it lasted 27 years and claimed nearly 500,000 lives. the building binge has been fueled by oil money. it is the power behind what has become africa's second largest oil producer after nigeria. it is made possible -- it has made possible 15% average growth between 2002 and 2008, but opposition candidates say the well has not trickled down to the country's 18 million people. they say while elites prosper, the vast majority remained mired -- remain mired in poverty. >> it is a difficult situation.
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we need running water, paved roads, more security for young people, and jobs for young people. young people who have studied have cleaning jobs or sweep the streets. >> political opponents say the government is corrupt. the nation's largest opposition party accuses him of rigging votes. in the 2008 election, you need 81% of the vote, compared to the government's 82%. since he came to power in 1979, he put the media under his control. in the run-up to the election, newspapers said the president is in the hearts of the people. >> we do not hide from the country's difficulties. we are realists -- pragmatic and practical. the mpla analyze the problems and shows the way to solve them.
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it is the party of truth, present and past. official results from friday's vote are expected in the next two weeks. >> in a moment, we will take a closer look at the difficulty of reporting in china. >> first, here are some of the other stories making news. the u.s. gulf coast is clearing up after the passage of hurricane isaac, now downgraded to a tropical depression. the storm dumped heavy rains on louisiana. much of the state is still affected by flooding. many areas continue to be without power. at least five people died in the storm. president barack obama will visit the region on monday. >> firefighters are battling wildfires in southern spain. the blazes have already claimed one life, and thousands have been forced to leave their homes.
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a decision by south african prosecutors to charge 217 mine workers with the 30 of -- the murder of 34 other striking colleagues has sparked public outrage. witnesses say the men were shot by police. many of the arrested miners have filed complaints of police abuse in detention. now reporting on the wealthy and powerful is often difficult, especially in countries where little more than lip service is paid to upholding freedom of the press. journalists in china, for example, regularly complained about restrictions. >> a group of german reporters have written to chancellor merkel describing a deteriorating situation in china. they charge authorities there with obstructing their work. sometimes i did it -- >> sometimes it begins harmlessly. two weeks ago, we were shooting
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video about polluted drinking water and took pictures on the outskirts of factories on the countryside. one company did not want us around. security staff detain us for nine hours while company agents with up anti-foreigner sentiment among the workers -- which -- whiped up -- whipped up anti- foreigner sentiment. they kicked the door is down and took our equipment -- kicked the doors down and took our equipment. the rules are made by the company bosses, and they want journalists driven out of town. the foreign correspondents club in china records and archives such incidents. they have been getting more and more common. >> in the last weeks, we saw that journalists were beaten by plainclothes people. also, we had incidents with a
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japanese correspondent, who was beaten by police. what happens also -- there is intimidation of the sources, the people with whom journalists are working. >> often during shooting, chinese fixers are put under pressure. sometimes the police even stand by filming the incident but without intervening. it is always our local employees who are summoned to be interrogated by the state security authorities. >> my assistant was often told during questioning that they knew where his parents lived and asked how they were doing. they use methods like that to intimidate chinese helpers, saying that they know about their personal lives, telling them to be careful what they say or organize. >> it is even more dangerous for our interview partners. they are often subjected to
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surveillance and their phone lines tapped. even when we are able to meet them and conduct an interview, there is the constant worry of what will happen to them after we have left. >> many people say quite openly what they think, but they are reluctant to be quoted openly. every journalist has to weigh how far they can go. >> in may, the authorities threw out al jazeera's correspondent after the network aired a report about chinese labor camps. they said she had violated chinese regulations. the law says journalist can travel freely in china and speak to whomever they want. the reality is very different. >> millions of children around the world are being caught up in a violent political disputes
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from the americas to asia. according to a report, the number is growing steadily. >> world vision has presented its annual report, saying more needs to be done to help children in regions of conflict, especially in regions like somalia and afghanistan. >> civil war and famine are forcing some of the farmers to flee their country. as often happens when conflict breaks out, children suffer most. in countries like somalia, they make up almost half the population. >> children are never made part of political discussions. their voice is never heard, but children are usually the worst affected, and they are completely affect -- completely ignored in these conflicts. >> children suffer the most in so-called failed states -- countries where central authorities have little or no power, as in afghanistan. regional warlords, the taliban, and a government propped up by foreign troops have been
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fighting for years. failed states receive about 30% of the world's development aid, but much of it does not get to where it is needed. >> they represent many of the countries that are really lagging behind in terms of development. so we need to focus more effort politically and financially on these countries. >> 20 or 30 countries around the world are considered failed states. they include afghanistan, somalia, south sudan, and the democratic republic of the congo. >> turning to some sports news, the draw for soccer's europa league is out. four german teams are in it. as well as last season's turkish cup winners. >> start should have an easier ride -- they take on denmark -- stood guard -- stuttgart should
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have an easier ride. >> hanover take on fc 20. the first round of group games kicks off on september 20. >> in the german bundesliga, and to looks like a familiar face is returning to help out -- it looks like a familiar face is returning to help out hamburg. >> he spent three years there before leaving for madrid. he reportedly wanted 37.5 million euros after hamburg initially bid 20 million last week. >> team germany put in a very strong start at the paraly mpics in london. >> the highlight was the judo
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competition in which twin's both won gold. carmen coming up in white was up first -- there she is. she soundly defeated her rival. >> a few minutes later, it was ramona's turned, in blue. she prevailed against her chinese opponent. >> good for them. >> well done. we will be back at the top of the hour with more news. stay with us. >> do not forget -- you can find more on our website at dw.de. see you soon. >> bye bye. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--
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